Essays

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Lynchland
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Essays

Post by Lynchland » 05 February 2018, 15:33

How Twin Peaks stretches television into the unknown (Brad Stevens / British Film Institute)
If Lynch is unique in having progressed from a postmodernist to a modernist position, the revived Twin Peaks suggests he may now be essaying an entirely new mode – and still progressing by moving backwards. When I first saw Inland Empire (2006), I had the impression this would be Lynch’s cinematic finale; the communal celebration with which it concludes indicated he had achieved a personal/artistic resolution, rendering anything he might do afterwards redundant. And one can hardly describe the new Twin Peaks as free of redundancy; on the contrary, it is very much about redundancy, treating narrative as less a dynamic process than a form of stasis, something constantly folding back upon itself (ultimately folding all the way back to the opening shots of the 1989 pilot).

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Lynch’s latest creation is thus a perfect example of a ‘between’ text – between cinema and television, modernism and postmodernism, narrative and non-narrative, work and play. Suspended precisely between two opposed regimes of images – one promising undemanding entertainment, the other stylistic rigour – it demonstrates that the gap separating Hollywood from the avant-garde may not be so wide as we might think.
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Lynchland
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Re: Essays

Post by Lynchland » 13 February 2018, 15:52

David Lynch’s Haunted Finale of “Twin Peaks: The Return” (Richard Brody / The New Yorker)
“Twin Peaks: The Return” is filled with episodes of horrific, grotesque sexual abuse of women, and also with the drama of women struggling with and against traditional gender roles. For instance, Janey-E—fulfilling with a stereotypical precision the role of the suburban housewife, concerned with the child, the meals, the budget, and the car, and who talks in domestic clichés to match—turns out to be tough-minded, bold, and courageous, able to stand up to bloodthirsty gangsters and face them down. Lynch depicts a wide variety of women in a wide variety of circumstances, almost all of which involve an element of submission and degradation, frustration and resentment. But, far from depicting their plights with a passive or bewildered detachment, he also suggests exactly what causes them to bear their burden in the face of pain and anguish: the wonder and the curse of love.
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