Season 3 Soundtrack

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Lhasa_apso
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Re: Season 3 Soundtrack

Post by Lhasa_apso » 17 July 2017, 17:44

Episode 3
"Mississippi" by The Cactus Blossoms on Twin Peaks

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8K_47fSG5HM


The music video (which came out after the band was featured on Twin Peaks)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bLBtSAoQqkw


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Lhasa_apso
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Re: Season 3 Soundtrack

Post by Lhasa_apso » 23 July 2017, 20:03

I thought episode 10 was a sad episode from beginning to end.

Rebekah Del Rio - No Stars

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HfRPLbSyiSM
Last edited by Lhasa_apso on 23 July 2017, 20:06, edited 1 time in total.

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Lhasa_apso
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Joined: 02 July 2017, 05:56

Re: Season 3 Soundtrack

Post by Lhasa_apso » 23 July 2017, 20:05

Episode 10
Harry Dean Stanton - Red River Valley

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ame5L8HJ6i0

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nlincy
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Re: Season 3 Soundtrack

Post by nlincy » 24 July 2017, 22:46

Part 11 - Heartbreaking, composed by Angelo Badalamenti

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RFe_oiZ9VbA
"Is it future... or is it... past?" http://tp3theories.canalblog.com/


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kollalfa
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A pianist's analyzis of Badalamenti's 'Heartbreaking' piece from part 11

Post by kollalfa » 30 July 2017, 09:27

I asked a friend of mine, who's a young and gifted classical pianist, about his thoughts on this music piece. Thought I'd share his response (freely translated from norwegian):
Will certainly call that beautiful art, yes! And you're right that it's almost impossible to recreate identically, because of the extreme rubatho (the tempo flowing freely) and espressivo touch and dynamics, emphasizing some tones to make it more expressive. Playing so freely does not only require piano skills, but is just as much a mental challenge: one must rely on oneself, any uncertainty will shine through and ruin the magic. This free play makes the magic. Had it been played straight forward without the rubatho, it would be a simple and uninterresting piece, but performed in this manner creates a thrill that draws the listener more into the music.

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Facundo
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Re: A pianist's analyzis of Badalamenti's 'Heartbreaking' piece from part 11

Post by Facundo » 30 July 2017, 17:23

kollalfa wrote:
30 July 2017, 09:27
I asked a friend of mine, who's a young and gifted classical pianist, about his thoughts on this music piece. Thought I'd share his response (freely translated from norwegian):
Will certainly call that beautiful art, yes! And you're right that it's almost impossible to recreate identically, because of the extreme rubatho (the tempo flowing freely) and espressivo touch and dynamics, emphasizing some tones to make it more expressive. Playing so freely does not only require piano skills, but is just as much a mental challenge: one must rely on oneself, any uncertainty will shine through and ruin the magic. This free play makes the magic. Had it been played straight forward without the rubatho, it would be a simple and uninterresting piece, but performed in this manner creates a thrill that draws the listener more into the music.
Very interesting analysis! Didn't noticed the pace of the rubatho.

The first part (before the "slow paced" part) seems to be very similar to Lucio Dalla's Caruso. It seems to be kinda a free version of it. Our friend Lynchland shared a interview where it says that Lynch asked to Badalamento something Italian, so it fits very well!
Fuego, camina conmigo | @ArgTwinpeaks

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