Press Review

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Ludolynch
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Press Review

Post by Ludolynch » 18 July 2017, 23:28

True Men (Keith Uhlich / MUBI)
What stands out most, however, is Margaret's punny observation about the Sheriffs Truman (Robert Forster and Michael Ontkean): True Men. On first encounter, her earnest reading of that line struck me as discordant—a rare moment where Lynch and Frost's surreal way with words and speech patterns tread into the thuddingly obvious. Yet on reflection and rewatch it seemed the key moment in an episode (and a series; and a body of work) frequently concerned with that very idea. What makes a man in the world of David Lynch?
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Dale Cooper is not what he seems...

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Lynchland
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Re: Press Review

Post by Lynchland » 18 July 2018, 14:59

David Lynch Finds Good and Bad Love in “Part 10″ (Chris Cabin / Collider)
There’s a special kind of joy that comes from watching Gordon geek out over the cute date that Albert is on with Jane Adams‘ Constance, one of the lead investigators on the Hastings case. It’s moments like those that have continued to give Lynch’s series emotion weight to balance its vast, ever-changing existential dilemmas.

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There was a similar thrill in watching the build toward Dougie’s big sex scene with Janey-E after she gets a full look at his toned body, as well as returning to the wacky world of Doctor Jacoby’s online conspiracy show and fake gold shovel outlet. Especially in the latter case, the suggestion continues to be that there must be just as much care put into the illusion as there is into the sales.
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Lynchland
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Re: Press Review

Post by Lynchland » 21 July 2018, 12:22

Candy-Colored (Noel Murray / The New-York Times)
Candie’s best bit comes when the boys send her down to the casino floor to find out why insurance agent Anthony Sinclair is sniffing around. They watch her through security cameras, as what’s supposed to be a simple assignment turns into her inexplicably gesturing on the small security screen, while the Mitchums watch silently, with mounting impatience. When they finally explode, it’s as a perfectly timed comic beat, like something out of “The Honeymooners.”

When Candie’s not being goofy or running errands, she and her co-workers lean against the wall of the Mitchums’ office, looking like perfectly posed pale pink statues against the blank industrial gray walls. That’s really what makes the red and pink stand out so much this week — because it’s set against so much steely shadow. When this new “Twin Peaks” goes dark with the color palette, it goes so dark that it’s sometimes hard to tell whether there are distinct shapes hidden within the blacks and grays, or whether that’s just the high-definition TV screen struggling with how to process all the monochrome. [...]

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In a series that’s been about changing times, it’s remarkable how deftly Lynch uses the quality of the image itself to illustrate a world becoming shadier, starker and — in every way — more gray.
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