Press Review

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Lynchland
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Re: Press Review

Post by Lynchland » 17 August 2018, 13:58

Big Secrets Spill Out in ‘Part 14,’ But the Truth Lies Within David Lynch’s Dreams (Ben Travers / IndieWire)
Monica Bellucci solves crimes in David Lynch’s dreams, Diane is Janey-E’s half-sister, and Andy is newly enlightened after taking a trip to the other side — phew! “Part 14” certainly isn’t short on talking points, but to claim reasonable comprehension would be a long shot. But that’s OK. Lynch’s black-and-white dream sequence foreshadowed an episode that played out just like it: Much was said, much was seen, but it’s not the literal interpretation of clues that matters: It’s learning how to believe in the impossible.

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Like an inverse interpretation of the series’ more introspective dream episodes (i.e., “Part 3” and “Part 8”), this hour was filled with exposition while Lynch’s imagination ran amok. The former served as a distraction from the latter; all that information was really just set-up for events to come, while the true meaning of “Part 14” came from the unknown.
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Roland K. / Lynchland

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Lynchland
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Re: Press Review

Post by Lynchland » 19 August 2018, 13:29

Who Is the Dreamer? (Noel Murray / The New York Times)
Several times during this season of “Twin Peaks,” right before an episode has ended with a musical performance, the show has featured brief scenes of young people talking at the Roadhouse. Sometimes these characters have returned later. But for the most part, these sketches have been disconnected to anything else happening on the show. They’ve functioned more as a reminder that the current generation of fresh-faced Twin Peaks residents is as mired in melodrama as Donna Hayward, Audrey Horne, Laura Palmer, James Hurley and Bobby Briggs once were.

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This week, though, the chitchat’s more meaningful than usual. Again, two young women are drinking and talking, unpacking some recent moment of distress in their lives. But when one mentions that her mother’s name is Tina, the soundtrack turns portentous. Observant viewers may remember that “Tina” is the name of the woman whom Audrey’s husband Charlie called to find out what happened to Audrey’s missing lover Billy. Now Tina’s daughter is talking about how she was one of the last people to see Billy alive, when he showed up unannounced at their house and bled all over their kitchen.

We still don’t know much about Billy or Tina, or how this all connects to Audrey. But it’s possibly meaningful that when Tina’s daughter is telling her story, she can’t recall whether her uncle was there that night or not. The deeper she goes into the anecdote, the less it sounds like she’s describing something that actually happened to her, and the more it sounds like she’s trying to recollect the details of a dream.”
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Roland K. / Lynchland

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